Bibliography Tag: gestational length

Crump et al., 2021

Crump, Casey, Groves, Alan, Sundquist, Jan, & Sundquist, Kristina; “Association of Preterm Birth With Long-term Risk of Heart Failure Into Adulthood;” JAMA Pediatrics, 2021, 175(7), 689-697; DOI: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2021.0131.

ABSTRACT:

Preterm birth has been associated with increased risk of heart failure (HF) early in life, but its association with new-onset HF in adulthood appears to be unknown. To determine whether preterm birth is associated with increased risk of HF from childhood into mid-adulthood in a large population-based cohort. This national cohort study was conducted in Sweden with data from 1973 through 2015. All singleton live births in Sweden during 1973 through 2014 were included. Gestational age at birth, identified from nationwide birth records. Heart failure, as identified from inpatient and outpatient diagnoses through 2015. Cox regression was used to determine hazard ratios (HRs) for HF associated with gestational age at birth while adjusting for other perinatal and maternal factors. Cosibling analyses assessed for potential confounding by unmeasured shared familial (genetic and/or environmental) factors. A total of 4 193 069 individuals were included (maximum age, 43 years; median age, 22.5 years). In 85.0 million person-years of follow-up, 4158 persons (0.1%) were identified as having HF (median [interquartile range] age, 15.4 [28.0] years at diagnosis). Preterm birth (gestational age <37 weeks) was associated with increased risk of HF at ages younger than 1 year (adjusted HR [aHR], 4.49 [95% CI, 3.86-5.22]), 1 to 17 years (aHR, 3.42 [95% CI, 2.75-4.27]), and 18 to 43 years (aHR, 1.42 [95% CI, 1.19-1.71]) compared with full-term birth (gestational age, 39-41 weeks). At ages 18 through 43 years, the HRs further stratified by gestational age were 4.72 (95% CI, 2.11-10.52) for extremely preterm births (22-27 weeks), 1.93 (95% CI, 1.37-2.71) for moderately preterm births (28-33 weeks), 1.24 (95% CI, 1.00-1.54) for late preterm births (34-36 weeks), and 1.09 (95% CI, 0.97-1.24) for early term births (37-38 weeks). The corresponding HF incidence rates (per 100 000 person-years) at ages 18 through 43 years were 31.7, 13.8, 8.7, and 7.3, respectively, compared with 6.6 for full-term births. These associations persisted when excluding persons with structural congenital cardiac anomalies. The associations at ages 18 through 43 years (but not <18 years) appeared to be largely explained by shared determinants of preterm birth and HF within families. Preterm birth accounted for a similar number of HF cases among male and female individuals. In this large national cohort, preterm birth was associated with increased risk of new-onset HF into adulthood. Survivors of preterm birth may need long-term clinical follow-up into adulthood for risk reduction and monitoring for HF.


Ferguson et al., 2019

Ferguson, K. K., Rosario, Z., McElrath, T. F., Velez Vega, C., Cordero, J. F., Alshawabkeh, A., & Meeker, J. D.; “Demographic risk factors for adverse birth outcomes in Puerto Rico in the PROTECT cohort;” Plos One, 2019, 14(6), e0217770; DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0217770.

ABSTRACT:

Preterm birth is a major public health problem, especially in Puerto Rico where the rates are among the highest observed worldwide, reaching 18% in 2011. The Puerto Rico Testsite for Exploring Contamination Threats (PROTECT) study is an ongoing investigation of environmental factors that contribute to this condition. In the present analysis, we sought to examine common risk factors for preterm birth and other adverse birth outcomes which have not been characterized previously in this unique population. Pregnant women from the PROTECT cohort are recruited from the heavily contaminated Northern coast of the island of Puerto Rico and are free of pre-existing conditions like diabetes. We examined associations between basic demographic, behavioral (e.g., tobacco and alcohol use), and pregnancy (e.g., season and year of delivery) characteristics as well as municipality of residence in relation to preterm birth (<37 weeks gestation), postterm birth (>/=41 weeks gestation), and small and large for gestational age in univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. Between 2011 and 2017, 1028 live singleton births were delivered as part of the PROTECT cohort. Of these, 107 (10%) were preterm. Preterm birth rates were higher among women with low socioeconomic status, as indicated by education level and income, and among women with high pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI). Odds ratios of small for gestational age delivery were higher for women who reported tobacco use in pregnancy and lower for women who delivered in the hurricane and dengue season (July-October). Overall, in pregnant women residing in Puerto Rico, socioeconomic status was associated with preterm birth but few other factors were associated with this or other adverse outcomes of pregnancy. Research to understand environmental factors that could be contributing to the preterm birth epidemic in Puerto Rico is necessary. FULL TEXT


Silver et al., 2021

Silver, M. K., Fernandez, J., Tang, J., McDade, A., Sabino, J., Rosario, Z., Velez Vega, C., Alshawabkeh, A., Cordero, J. F., & Meeker, J. D.; “Prenatal Exposure to Glyphosate and Its Environmental Degradate, Aminomethylphosphonic Acid (AMPA), and Preterm Birth: A Nested Case-Control Study in the PROTECT Cohort (Puerto Rico);” Environmental Health Perspectives, 2021, 129(5), 57011; DOI: 10.1289/EHP7295.

ABSTRACT:

BACKGROUND: Glyphosate (GLY) is the most heavily used herbicide in the world. Despite nearly ubiquitous exposure, few studies have examined prenatal GLY exposure and potentially adverse pregnancy outcomes. Preterm birth (PTB) is a risk factor for neonatal mortality and adverse health effects in childhood.

OBJECTIVES: We examined prenatal exposure to GLY and a highly persistent environmental degradate of GLY, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), and odds of PTB in a nested case-control study within the ongoing Puerto Rico Testsite for Exploring Contamination Threats (PROTECT) pregnancy cohort in northern Puerto Rico.

METHODS: GLY and AMPA in urine samples collected at 18+/-2 (Visit 1) and 26+/-2 (Visit 3) wk gestation (53 cases/194 randomly selected controls) were measured using gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate associations with PTB (delivery <37wk completed gestation).

RESULTS: Detection rates in controls were 77.4% and 77.5% for GLY and 52.8% and 47.7% for AMPA, and geometric means (geometric standard deviations) were 0.44 (2.50) and 0.41 (2.56) mug/L for GLY and 0.25 (3.06) and 0.20 (2.87) mug/L for AMPA, for Visits 1 and 3, respectively. PTB was significantly associated with specific gravity-corrected urinary GLY and AMPA at Visit 3, whereas associations with levels at Visit 1 and the Visits 1-3 average were largely null or inconsistent. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for an interquartile range increase in exposure at Visit 3 were 1.35 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.83) and 1.67 (95% CI: 1.26, 2.20) for GLY and AMPA, respectively. ORs for Visit 1 and the visit average were closer to the null.

DISCUSSION: Urine GLY and AMPA levels in samples collected near the 26th week of pregnancy were associated with increased odds of PTB in this modestly sized nested case-control study. Given the widespread use of GLY, multiple potential sources of AMPA, and AMPA’s persistence in the environment, as well as the potential for long-term adverse health effects in preterm infants, further investigation in other populations is warranted.

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Kogevinas, 2021

Kogevinas, M.; “Glyphosate Exposure during Pregnancy and Preterm Birth (More Research Is Needed);” Environmental Health Perspectives, 2021, 129(5), 51301; DOI: 10.1289/EHP9428.

ABSTRACT:

Not Available

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Haas et al., 2015

Haas, D. M., Parker, C. B., Wing, D. A., Parry, S., Grobman, W. A., Mercer, B. M., Simhan, H. N., Hoffman, M. K., Silver, R. M., Wadhwa, P., Iams, J. D., Koch, M. A., Caritis, S. N., Wapner, R. J., Esplin, M. S., Elovitz, M. A., Foroud, T., Peaceman, A. M., Saade, G. R., Willinger, M., Reddy, U. M., & NuMo, M. b study; “A description of the methods of the Nulliparous Pregnancy Outcomes Study: monitoring mothers-to-be (nuMoM2b);” American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2015, 212(4), 539 e531-539 e524; DOI: 10.1016/j.ajog.2015.01.019.

ABSTRACT:

OBJECTIVE: The primary aim of the “Nulliparous Pregnancy Outcomes Study: monitoring mothers-to-be” is to determine maternal characteristics, which include genetic, physiologic response to pregnancy, and environmental factors that predict adverse pregnancy outcomes.

STUDY DESIGN: Nulliparous women in the first trimester of pregnancy were recruited into an observational cohort study. Participants were seen at 3 study visits during pregnancy and again at delivery. We collected data from in-clinic interviews, take-home surveys, clinical measurements, ultrasound studies, and chart abstractions. Maternal biospecimens (serum, plasma, urine, cervicovaginal fluid) at antepartum study visits and delivery specimens (placenta, umbilical cord, cord blood) were collected, processed, and stored. The primary outcome of the study was defined as pregnancy ending at <37+0 weeks’ gestation. Key study hypotheses involve adverse pregnancy outcomes of spontaneous preterm birth, preeclampsia, and fetal growth restriction.

RESULTS: We recruited 10,037 women to the study. Basic characteristics of the cohort at screening are reported.

CONCLUSION: The “Nulliparous Pregnancy Outcomes Study: monitoring mothers-to-be” cohort study methods and procedures can help investigators when they plan future projects.

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Donahue et al., 2010

Donahue, S. M., Kleinman, K. P., Gillman, M. W., & Oken, E., “Trends in birth weight and gestational length among singleton term births in the United States: 1990-2005,” Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2010, 115(2 Pt 1), 357-364. DOI: 10.1097/AOG.0b013e3181cbd5f5.

ABSTRACT:

OBJECTIVE: To estimate changes over time in birth weight for gestational age and in gestational length among term singleton neonates born from 1990 to 2005.

METHODS: We used data from the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics for 36,827,828 singleton neonates born at 37-41 weeks of gestation, 1990-2005. We examined trends in birth weight, birth weight for gestational age, large and small for gestational age, and gestational length in the overall population and in a low-risk subgroup defined by maternal age, race or ethnicity, education, marital status, smoking, gestational weight gain, delivery route, and obstetric care characteristics.

RESULTS: In 2005, compared with 1990, we observed decreases in birth weight (-52 g in the overall population, -79 g in a homogenous low-risk subgroup) and large for gestational age birth (-1.4% overall, -2.2% in the homogenous subgroup) that were steeper after 1999 and persisted in regression analyses adjusted for maternal and neonate characteristics, gestational length, cesarean delivery, and induction of labor. Decreases in mean gestational length (-0.34 weeks overall) were similar regardless of route of delivery or induction of labor.

CONCLUSION: Recent decreases in fetal growth among U.S., term, singleton neonates were not explained by trends in maternal and neonatal characteristics, changes in obstetric practices, or concurrent decreases in gestational length.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: III.

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Catov et al., 2016

Catov, J. M., Lee, M., Roberts, J. M., Xu, J., & Simhan, H. N., “Race Disparities and Decreasing Birth Weight: Are All Babies Getting Smaller?,” American Journal of Epidemiology, 2016, 183(1), 15-23. DOI: 10.1093/aje/kwv194.

ABSTRACT:

The mean infant birth weight in the United States increased for decades, but it might now be decreasing. Given race disparities in fetal growth, we explored race-specific trends in birth weight at Magee-Womens Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, from 1997 to 2011. Among singleton births delivered at 37-41 weeks (n = 70,607), we evaluated the proportions who were small for gestational age and large for gestational age and changes in mean birth weights over time. Results were stratified by maternal race/ethnicity. Since 1997, the number of infants born small for their gestational ages increased (8.7%-9.9%), whereas the number born large for their gestational ages decreased (8.9%-7.7%). After adjustment for gestational week at birth, maternal characteristics, and pregnancy conditions, birth weight decreased by 2.20 g per year (P < 0.0001). Decreases were greater for spontaneous births. Reductions were significantly greater in infants born to African-American women than in those born to white women (-3.78 vs. -1.88 per year; P for interaction = 0.010). Quantile regression models indicated that birth weight decreased across the entire distribution, but reductions among infants born to African-American women were limited to those in the upper quartile after accounting for maternal factors. Limiting the analysis to low-risk women eliminated birth weight reductions. Birth weight has decreased in recent years, and reductions were greater in infants born to African-American women. These trends might be explained by accumulation of risk factors such as hypertension and prepregnancy obesity that disproportionately affect African-American women. Our results raise the possibility of worsening race disparities in fetal growth. FULL TEXT


Eskenazi et al., 2004

Brenda Eskenazi, Kim Harley, Asa Bradman, Erin Weltzien, Nicholas P. Jewell, Dana B. Barr, Clement E. Furlong, and Nina T. Holland, “Association of in Utero Organophosphate Pesticide Exposure and Fetal Growth and Length of Gestation in an Agricultural Population,” Environmental Health Perspecitives, 112:10, 2004, DOI: 10.1289/ehp.6789

ABSTRACT:

Although pesticide use is widespread, little is known about potential adverse health effects of in utero exposure. We investigated the effects of  organophosphate pesticide exposure during pregnancy on fetal growth and gestational duration in a cohort of low-income, Latina women living in an agricultural community in the Salinas Valley, California. We measured nonspecific metabolites of organophosphate pesticides (dimethyl and diethyl phosphates) and metabolites specific to malathion (malathion dicarboxylic acid), chlorpyrifos [O,O-diethyl O-(3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinyl) phosphoro-thioate], and parathion (4-nitrophenol) in maternal urine collected twice during pregnancy. We also measured levels of cholinesterase in whole blood and butyryl cholinesterase in plasma in maternal and umbilical cord blood. We failed to demonstrate an adverse relationship between fetal growth and any measure of in utero organophosphate pesticide exposure. In fact, we found increases in body length and head circumference associated with some exposure measures.
However, we did find decreases in gestational duration associated with two measures of in utero pesticide exposure: urinary dimethyl phosphate metabolites [βadjusted = –0.41 weeks per log10 unit increase; 95% confidence interval (CI), –0.75––0.02; p = 0.02], which reflect exposure to dimethyl organophosphate compounds such as malathion, and umbilical cord cholinesterase (βadjusted = 0.34 weeks per unit increase; 95% CI, 0.13–0.55; p = 0.001). Shortened gestational duration was most clearly related to increasing exposure levels in the latter part of pregnancy. These associations with gestational age may be biologically plausible given that organophosphate pesticides depress cholinesterase and acetylcholine stimulates contraction of the uterus. However, despite these observed associations, the rate of preterm delivery in this population (6.4%) was lower than in a U.S. reference population.   FULL TEXT


Winchester et al., 2016

Winchester P, Proctor C, Ying J, “County-level pesticide use and risk of shortened gestation and preterm birth,” Acta Paediatrica, 2016, 105:3, DOI: 10.1111/apa.13288.

ABSTRACT:

AIM: This study assesses the association between pesticide exposure in pregnancy, preterm birth (PTB) and shortened gestation.

METHODS: Pregnancy information was abstracted from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Non-Public Use Natality Datasets 1990-2005. Pesticide use in maternal county of residence was calculated using California Pesticide Use Reporting (PUR) data 1990-2005. Counties were ranked by pesticide use, and birth months were sorted by peak (May-June) or nonpeak (other months) pesticide use. Multivariate logistical regression models were used.

RESULTS: Counties with higher pesticide use were associated with higher PTB (low 8.59 ± 0.11%, moderate 9.25 ± 0.07%, high 10.0 ± 0.06%, p’s < 0.001) and shorter gestations (low 39.197 ± 0.014 weeks, moderate 39.126 ± 0.011 weeks, high 39.049 ± 0.011 weeks, p’s < 0.001). Peak pesticide months were associated with higher PTB (10.01 ± 0.05% vs. 9.36 ± 0.05%, p < 0.001) and shorter gestations (39.069 ± 0.007 weeks vs. 39.122 ± 0.007 weeks, p < 0.001). The pesticide effect on shortened gestation and higher PTB was found in all racial groups. Pesticide use was highest for fungicides > insecticides > fumigants > herbicides > others. Each pesticide type was found to be associated with higher PTB and shorter gestation.

CONCLUSION: PTB and shortened gestation were significantly associated with pesticide use in maternal county of residence regardless of race, gestation at birth, and in most risk categories.   FULL TEXT