Bibliography Tag: seasonal

Nomura et al., 2022

Nomura, H., Hamada, R., Wada, K., Saito, I., Nishihara, N., Kitahara, Y., Watanabe, S., Nakane, K., Nagata, C., Kondo, T., Kamijima, M., Ueyama, J.; “Temporal trend and cross-sectional characterization of urinary concentrations of glyphosate in Japanese children from 2006 to 2015;” International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health, 2022, 242, 113963; DOI:10.1016/j.ijheh.2022.113963.

ABSTRACT:

Background Over the past two decades, domestic shipments of glyphosate (Gly), in the form of an ionic salt, have been increasing steadily in Japan. This increase has raising concerns about the effects of chemical exposure on children. The International Agency for Research on Cancer classified Gly as a “probably carcinogenic to humans (Group 2A)” in 2015. The purpose of the current study was to analyze Gly in urine samples of Japanese children to determine temporal changes, seasonal changes, and gender differences.

Method First-morning urine samples were obtained from 50 Japanese children (4–6-year-old) in October of 2006, 2011, and 2015 (total = 150) to investigate the temporal trends in urinary Gly concentrations. Additionally, first-morning urine samples were collected from 3-year-old children in August–September of 2012 (summer; n = 42) and in February of 2013 (winter; n = 42) to investigate the seasonal and gender differences, and the correlations between urinary Gly concentrations and insecticide exposure biomarkers. Urine samples were analyzed to measure for Gly using a liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS).

Results Detectable Gly concentrations were found in 41% of the 234 children. The 75th percentile and maximum concentrations of urinary Gly were 0.20 and 1.33 μg/L, respectively. The urinary Gly concentration in 2015 was significantly higher than in 2006, suggesting that the Gly exposure levels have been increasing. No seasonal or gender-specific differences in urinary Gly concentrations were observed, and no correlation with insecticide exposure biomarkers was found.

Conclusion This study revealed that Gly exposure trends show an increase between 2006 and 2015, and that season and gender were not the exposure-determining factors. Overall, urinary concentrations of Gly were comparable with studies from other countries.